What are sealants and why do we need them?

A sealant is a thin, protective coating that is painted on the teeth. The material quickly bonds to the surfaces of teeth and hardes, covering all the little ridges and nooks to protect the entire surface of the tooth from decay. They essentially work like an invisible shield to protect teeth, especially among children who are most vulnerable to decay.

School aged children (ages 6-11) that don’t get sealants are three times more likely to get cavities in their molars than those who get sealants put on their teeth during childhood. The best part about dental sealants from a children’s perspective is that they’re pain free and application is quick and easy! Parents love that they protect against 80% of cavities for 2 years and protect against 50% of cavities for up to 4 years.


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Condition
Root Canal

Symptoms
Tooth Pain

Treatment
Root Canal
Crown

Prevention

Dental sealants prevent 80% of cavities in the back teeth which are where 9 out of 10 cavities occur!

Children are not the only ones that can benefit from sealants. Adults can help prevent future cavities with the use of sealants as well. Regardless of how young or old you are, everyone is susceptible to cavities and decay. No matter how well you brush and floss there are just some surfaces of the teeth that are hard to reach or get missed easily. Sealants are a great preventive measure to save you money and pain that is often associated with tooth decay.


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