Gum Disease

diabetes

If you are living with diabetes, you already know that you’re at risk of other health complications. But did you know that your condition means you should take extra steps to take care of your teeth and gums, too?  Researchers from Rutgers University recently found that people with both type…

obesity

You”ve probably heard that being overweight or obese can contribute to high cholesterol, heart disease and diabetes. But what about gum disease? Is it possible that obesity contributes to the development of gingivitis? The answer is yes! A recent study published in the Journal of Periodontology found that individuals with higher body…

dental plaque

A team from the University of Washington recently identified and classified the different ways people respond to the buildup of dental plaque. The study is the first of its kind to look at how individuals respond to the bacteria-filled, sticky biofilm that accumulates on teeth. The team’s work, published in…

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The American Dental Association states that if your gums are bleeding, it could be a sign of gingivitis or poor dental hygiene, and you should be sure to brush and floss at least twice a day to improve your symptoms. But a new study from the University of Washington suggests…

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When you cough, do you notice a metallic taste in your mouth? Or do you notice it when you’re eating or drinking something? You may chalk it up as unexplainable, but it’s not something you should let go for too long. Having a metallic taste in your mouth might be…

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For decades, researchers have known that certain bacteria in the mouth can contribute to the development of gum disease. Still, in a first-of-its-kind study, researchers from Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin have shown that a unicellular parasite, known as Entamoeba gingavalis, is also a contributor to the condition. The study found the…

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With an increase in COVID-19 cases across Texas, you may find that you’re wearing your mask more often. While it probably isn’t your favorite thing to do for a few different reasons, some people don’t like wearing a mask because they’ve noticed something unpleasant — that they have bad breath!…

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Brushing, flossing and regularly seeing the dentist are good for your teeth, but they’re also good for your overall health. Colorado State University microbiome researchers have released study results that help to support the conventional wisdom that keeping the mouth healthy keeps the body healthy. The researchers explored how invisible…

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Would you expect that a compound used to make car bumpers strong and to protect wood decks could be used in repairing cavities? While it sounds a little strange at first, researchers at the OHSU School of Dentistry in Portland, Oregon, hope that this compound will add extra strength to…

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Are you wearing braces to help straighten your teeth? While braces are a conventional treatment to improve smiles, expand the airway, balance the bite and provide other benefits, they can contribute to the development of gum disease if you’re not practicing good oral hygiene. To help keep your mouth healthy,…